Search Results for 'Lieutenant'

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The British raid on Inis Mór, December 1920

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November 1920 was a bloody month in Galway with the killing of Eileen Quinn, Fr Michael Griffin, Michael Moran, and Harry and Patrick Loughnane. D Company Auxiliaries had made their presence felt.

Galway hero The Storyteller to be given King George assignment after Grade One success

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Following a Grade One victory at Down Royal this month, The Storyteller could now head to Kempton on St Stephen’s Day and run in the prestigious King George VI Chase.

What if a man was abducted and forced into marriage?

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Daniel O’Connell has weaved in and out of the Diary columns in recent weeks and unexpectedly he appears again, not as the great political champion that he was, but in the interesting study of Marriage in Ireland 1660 - 1925. *

Widow Wilkins and the delicate matter of her ‘breach of promise’

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The case of Blake v Wilkins in 1817 was so eagerly anticipated that every lodging house in Galway, ‘even the humblest in the town was' was filled to overflowing.

Hearing voices in the wind

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I have often wondered how the unusual name of Zetland found its way to the head of Cashel Bay in the heart of Connemara. It is, of course, the name of a well known hotel today. The hotel was founded in the closing years of the 19th century, by the son of a mountain farmer, JJ O'Loughlin, who had a canny instinct for business. The hotel was originally called The Zetland Arms, and before that The Viceroy's Rest. All these names allude to the hotel's distinguished patron Lawrence Dundas, Viceroy or Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1889 to 1902, in which year he became the Marquis of Zetland.

The incomparable Jane Eyre

In the edition of the Galway Weekly Advertiser March 25 1843 extensive coverage is given to the funeral of George Frederick De Carteret, a young ensign in her Majesty’s 30th Regiment, who drowned when he fell into the docks on his way back to the Shambles barracks three days before. He served on the revenue cutter The Raven. After a ‘party of pleasure’ he was walking along the docks, ‘the night being pitchy dark and tempestuous’ he was blown over ‘the brink’ and drowned before his fellow officers could reach him.*

The power merchants who ruled Galway

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Under Norman rule Galway rapidly developed from an obscure village into an important seaport with trade contacts all over Europe. This transformation was entirely due to the merchant community who made themselves into an oligarchy who not only owned and directed the town’s trade, but completely controlled the municipal government, the election of mayors, and, uniquely, the appointment of priests and wardens to St Nicholas’ Collegiate church. They enjoyed total power. They lived in opulent houses, many of which had elaborately carved doorways, secure within the walls of the town, indifferent to the Gaelic natives who were kept firmly outside the gates.*

The Greatest Show on Earth rolls into town

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The Greatest Show on Earth - was the tag line used by the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus for 146 years until it shut up shop two years ago and Cecil B. DeMille's 1952 movie about the same institution starring Charlton Heston picked up two Academy Awards, including one for Best Picture.

‘Beyond our wildest expectations’

Week III

‘Beyond our wildest expectations’

Week III

 

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